Managing Ignatius: The Lunacy of Lucky Dogs and Life in New Orleans

Managing Ignatius The Lunacy of Lucky Dogs and Life in New Orleans In the s John Kennedy Toole wrote the Pulitzer Prize winning novel A Confederacy of Dunces which details the uproarious misadventures of Ignatius J Reilly an overweight genius misfit Though he h

  • Title: Managing Ignatius: The Lunacy of Lucky Dogs and Life in New Orleans
  • Author: Jerry Strahan
  • ISBN: 9780767903240
  • Page: 445
  • Format: Paperback
  • In the 1960s John Kennedy Toole wrote the Pulitzer Prize winning novel A Confederacy of Dunces, which details the uproarious misadventures of Ignatius J Reilly, an overweight genius misfit Though he has visions of grandeur, Ignatius winds up selling wienies for Paradise Vendors, Inc the fictional equivalent of Lucky Dogs , in New Orleans famed French Quarter Lest youIn the 1960s John Kennedy Toole wrote the Pulitzer Prize winning novel A Confederacy of Dunces, which details the uproarious misadventures of Ignatius J Reilly, an overweight genius misfit Though he has visions of grandeur, Ignatius winds up selling wienies for Paradise Vendors, Inc the fictional equivalent of Lucky Dogs , in New Orleans famed French Quarter Lest you think that the outlandish world of Ignatius was only a figment of Toole s vivid imagination, in Managing Ignatius Jerry E Strahan relates his amusing and bemusing experiences working for than two decades with the audacious characters who compose the actual stable of Lucky Dog vendors Strahan weaves delectable vignettes of the Vieux Carre demimonde in whose midst he makes a living a group blending panhandlers, prostitutes, pimps, con artists, schizophrenics, drifters, jazz musicians, strippers, bikers, and transvestites Over the years they ve all worked for Lucky Dogs, truly an equal opportunity employer They often drink too much, party too long, and work too little In managing these eccentrics, Strahan serves variously as peacemaker, negotiator, marriage counselor, detective, father figure, and banker Sometimes all in the same day He tells all their stories with a gently ironic realism, revealing his peculiar managerial challenges with keen appreciation for the human condition Like Ignatius, he understands how fickle Fortuna can be.

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      Published :2019-07-02T04:41:53+00:00

    About “Jerry Strahan”

    1. Jerry Strahan

      Jerry Strahan Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Managing Ignatius: The Lunacy of Lucky Dogs and Life in New Orleans book, this is one of the most wanted Jerry Strahan author readers around the world.

    996 thoughts on “Managing Ignatius: The Lunacy of Lucky Dogs and Life in New Orleans”

    1. Do you ever pick up one of those books and 4 or 5 chapters in realize:A.) I really don't careandB.) Half this shit must be an exageration?I read Confederacy, the book the title of this book gives a nod to and loved it. I started reading this and figured this guy took a hectic job and tried to turn it into a book deal. I just really couldn't get into it. Especially the part where he basically breaks into an employees house to wake him up for work and another part where he drives a butch employee [...]


    2. This is the history of Lucky Dogs in New Orleans, and what a checkered past! The characters (because they all feel larger than life) of the French Quarter, the misadventures of managers, it's all so entertaining. If you haven't been to New Orleans, it will feel like fiction, but if you've been blessed with the opportunity to be there, you know the truth in these pages. Now I want a Lucky Dog, with chili and onions


    3. I've been wanting to read this since I was a junior in high school and my English teacher recommended it to me. Finally, ten years later I happened upon it in a used bookstore — and while I'm glad to finally have found it, Managing Ignatius wasn't really worth the wait.I do like reading about the history of Lucky Dogs and the French Quarter, especially since I don't remember much of the years I spent there as a child at my family's business. I enjoyed most of the anecdotes of all the wacky cha [...]


    4. There's a lot of funny little stories in this book, which takes advantage of the fame of Confederacy of Dunces to give a non-fiction account of the real-life NOLA hot dog venders. The writing style is a little irritating - lots of 5 cent words here - and it runs long. A book about half as long concetrating on the crazy characters and incidents, and dropping, say, the author's discussions of his own writing career, and some of the repetitive stories, would have been better. Even with those drawba [...]


    5. I come down to New Orleans a few times a year to visit family, and I always read a NOLA book en route. Oddly enough, I found this little gem in a used book sale shortly after a recent re-reading Confederacy of Dunces. I liked this one better than the novel. It is an entrepreneurial memoir that kinda runs on and on, but then again it's a slice of history that few folks were able to witness and live long enough to write about. Jerry Strahan's voice is conservative biz-like yet funny and street-wis [...]


    6. I have been wanting to read this book for YEARS, always ask for it in used book stores. Today, there it was on the shelf at library book sale. It is going on the top of the reading pile. Always good to read about New Orleans as we approach Mardi Gras.How sad that after all of this time I really didnt like this book. The colorful characters in this book are really very sad. Jerry simply lists one stupid, crazy or outrageous action after another, but doesnt seem to have the writing ability to make [...]


    7. Being a native New Orlenian, this pseudo-memoir rekindled my appreciation for having been so lucky to grow up in this quirky city. If you have lived in the city for any appreciable amount of time (and even if you haven't), I highly recommend it.Read this book for what I believe it is, though - a nostalgic love story of the French Quarter and the colorful characters who have called it home. If you are looking for a serious memoir, you may be disappointed. If you are looking for a light-hearted gl [...]


    8. Imagine an involved description of a less-well-known civil war battle. Instead of generals & foot soldiers, drug addicts & snowbirds; instead of Gettysburg's shoe factory or Appamatox's courthouse, hot dog carts. Maybe it would have been easier to understand with a map of New Orleans, but that might have made it too much work.I read this book because I was looking for insights in working with a transient population (I work in a homeless shelter). I didn't find any, but I still enjoyed th [...]


    9. If you are a fan of New Orleans, and the "quarter creatures", then this will be an enjoyable read for you. If not, or you're unfamiliar with the area/people, this will probably not be so great. It is disjointed at best and confusing at worst. The book is a bit all over the place and the story lines are hard to follow at times. But, because I love the French Quarter so much, I'm giving it an "I liked it."


    10. 3.5 stars.Yes, it's really nothing more than a long list of goofy vendors and their own particular foibles. But then again, that's pretty much what I expected it to be. Not so sure that people criticizing it for that have much of a leg to stand on.If you like New Orleans, Ignatius Reilly, or eating hot dogs on the street, you'll probably find something in here to like. If, like me, you like all 3 of those things, you'll enjoy it even more.


    11. I really wanted to like this one, it's about New Orleans and has a forward by Stephen Ambrose and is supposed to be about weird characters in NOLA, but in the end it wasn't well written enough, all the people and stories just ran together and didn't make me sympathetic to them. but oh well, it still made me want to go to new orleans


    12. Some stories were funny. Some meh. Lots of attempts by the author to prove he's not one of "them," which I don't doubt, all of which detract from the silly. But he's a self-proclaimed conservative white southern male (almost verbatim) who isn't afraid to let his views on gays, other races, etc stand out loud and proud. Eliminate that, and I'd rate it higher.


    13. this is a non-fiction book written by the man who managed Lucky Dogs for many years. There are hilarious anecdotes about the real-life Lucky Dog vendors. You can just imagine ignatious popping up at any time.


    14. Sometimes funny, sometimes interesting. I never knew much about luckydogs before now(I've only drunkenly eaten one). Jerry Strahan(I may be related to this guy btw) sometime drifts too far into the "wow look at these weirdo kooky people!" at times, rather than humanizing them.


    15. This book was fun to read while I was visiting New Orleans, which is a city that I love to visit. Admittedly, I have read Confederacy of Dunces twice, so I must be the audience for Mr. Strahan's book.


    16. Fun to read, although a bit arduous at times, like listening to someone reminisce long after you've lost interest. It was enjoyable to read about places I am familiar with; it only served to solidify my position: "God, I hate the Quarter."


    17. The story of a manager of hot dog vending carts in New Orleans (Ignatius being the name of the main character in The Confederacy of Dunces), this book is an entertaining look at some of the lesser aspects of managing when people aren't committed, motivated, or loyal.


    18. The name Ignatius appears in the title as a nod to 'Confederacy of Dunces' whose main character is an eccentric lucky dog vendor. The lucky dog vendors described in the book are certainly a colorful bunch.


    19. This book is pretty much a collection of stories of the crazy people who work Lucky Dog carts. While Strahan manages to skewer his workers he's far too kind to himself, offering very little insight into what was going on in his own mind.


    20. The source material is fancifully wonderful, and there are passages that are certainly chuckle worthy, but the author cannot escape his autobiographical\historical tone, which dilutes the impact of the narration.


    21. If you have read and loved Confederacy of Dunces, Managing Ignatius is a hilarious companion. It's the memoir of Jerry Strahan, who managed Lucky Dogs in New Orleans for years. The stories of the vendor antics were insane, funny, and worthy of Ignatius Riley in his full pirate garb.


    22. The hot dog vendors formed a colorful subspecies of New Orleans denizen. What a chaotic business, but what fund to read about it.


    23. Can briefly rekindle any fond memories of New Orleans or Confederacy of Dunces you might cherish, but don't expect to see Toole-worthy comic characters.




    24. An interesting chronicle of what it was like to work in the French Quarter of NOLA during the last half of the twenty first century.


    25. I'm a sucker for tales of insane degenerates' antics, but the author's constant declarations (outright and implicit) of I'm-a-conservative-Southern-boy take away some of the humor value.


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