Animal, Vegetable, Miracle

Animal Vegetable Miracle Hang on for the ride with characteristic poetry and pluck Barbara Kingsolver and her family sweep readers along on their journey away from the industrial food pipeline to a rural life in which they v

  • Title: Animal, Vegetable, Miracle
  • Author: Barbara Kingsolver Steven L. Hopp Camille Kingsolver
  • ISBN: 9780060853570
  • Page: 271
  • Format: Audio CD
  • Hang on for the ride with characteristic poetry and pluck, Barbara Kingsolver and her family sweep readers along on their journey away from the industrial food pipeline to a rural life in which they vow to buy only food raised in their own neighborhood, grow it themselves, or learn to live without it Their good hud search yields surprising discoveries about turkey seHang on for the ride with characteristic poetry and pluck, Barbara Kingsolver and her family sweep readers along on their journey away from the industrial food pipeline to a rural life in which they vow to buy only food raised in their own neighborhood, grow it themselves, or learn to live without it Their good hud search yields surprising discoveries about turkey sex life and overly zealous zucchini plants, en route to a food culture that s better for the neighborhood and also better on the table.Part memoir, part journalistic investigation, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle makes a passionate case for putting the kitchen back at the center of family life, and diversified farms at the center of the American diet.

    • [PDF] ↠ Free Read Å Animal, Vegetable, Miracle : by Barbara Kingsolver Steven L. Hopp Camille Kingsolver ↠
      271 Barbara Kingsolver Steven L. Hopp Camille Kingsolver
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      Posted by:Barbara Kingsolver Steven L. Hopp Camille Kingsolver
      Published :2019-07-09T04:24:40+00:00

    About “Barbara Kingsolver Steven L. Hopp Camille Kingsolver”

    1. Barbara Kingsolver Steven L. Hopp Camille Kingsolver

      Barbara Kingsolver is an American novelist, essayist, and poet She was raised in rural Kentucky and lived briefly in Africa in her early childhood Kingsolver earned degrees in Biology at DePauw University and the University of Arizona and worked as a freelance writer before she began writing novels Her most famous works include The Poisonwood Bible, the tale of a missionary family in the Congo, and Animal, Vegetable, Miracle, a non fiction account of her family s attempts to eat locally.Her work often focuses on topics such as social justice, biodiversity, and the interaction between humans and their communities and environments Each of her books published since 1993 have been on The New York Times Best Seller list Kingsolver has received numerous awards, including the UK s Orange Prize for Fiction 2010, for The Lacuna and the National Humanities Medal She has been nominated for the PEN Faulkner Award and the Pulitzer Prize.In 2000, Kingsolver established the Bellwether Prize to support literature of social change Kingsolver was born in Annapolis, Maryland in 1955 and grew up in Carlisle in rural Kentucky When Kingsolver was seven years old, her father, a physician, took the family to the former Republic of Congo in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo Her parents worked in a public health capacity, and the family lived without electricity or running water.After graduating from high school, Kingsolver attended DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana on a music scholarship, studying classical piano Eventually, however, she changed her major to biology when she realized that classical pianists compete for six job openings a year, and the rest of them get to play Blue Moon in a hotel lobby She was involved in activism on her campus, and took part in protests against the Vietnam war She graduated with a Bachelor of Science in 1977, and moved to France for a year before settling in Tucson, Arizona, where she would live for much of the next two decades In 1980 she enrolled in graduate school at the University of Arizona, where she earned a Master s degree in ecology and evolutionary biology.Kingsolver began her full time writing career in the mid 1980s as a science writer for the university, which eventually lead to some freelance feature writing She began her career in fiction writing after winning a short story contest in a local Phoenix newspaper In 1985 she married Joseph Hoffmann their daughter Camille was born in 1987 She moved with her daughter to Tenerife in the Canary Islands for a year during the first Gulf war, mostly due to frustration over America s military involvement After returning to the US in 1992, she separated from her husband.In 1994, Kingsolver was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Letters from her alma mater, DePauw University She was also married to Steven Hopp, that year, and their daughter, Lily, was born in 1996 In 2004, Kingsolver moved with her family to a farm in Washington County, Virginia, where they currently reside In 2008, she received an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Duke University, where she delivered a commencement address entitled How to be Hopeful.In a 2010 interview with The Guardian, Kingsolver says, I never wanted to be famous, and still don t, the universe rewarded me with what I dreaded most She says created her own website just to compete with a plethora of fake ones, as a defence to protect my family from misinformation abhors a vacuum If you don t define yourself, it will get done for you in colourful ways.

    412 thoughts on “Animal, Vegetable, Miracle”

    1. I do not want to have lunch with Barbara Kingsolver. I do not want to sit across the table from this self-satisfied woman and have her gently scold me for eating imported "world traveler" foods, like bananas. I also do not want to hear any more of her stories about how awesome she and her family are, and how they were able to eat primarily off what they could grow in their backyard, (plenty of fresh vegetables!) or buy from local farmers (who are all personal friends, anyway! Aren't we cool?). I [...]


    2. Barbara Kingsolver has long been one of my favorite writers, but this most recent book was a bit of a mixed bag for me. The book covers the year she and her family spent eating only food they had either grown themselves or purchased from local farmers personally known to them. Kingsolver’s skill as a storyteller is undiminished, and there are some wonderful sections as she relates their adventures plotting how to foist some of their bumper zucchini harvest off on unsuspecting neighbors and how [...]


    3. This book was one of my big disappointments so far this year, because I went in thinking I'd really like it and wound up so unimpressed that I think I actually hated it. The premise of the book is an interesting one, so interesting that I called my mother on the way back from the bookstore to tell her all about this new book I just picked up that I thought she'd really like! Barbara Kingsolver and her family have decided, for various environmental, political, and health reasons, to eat locally f [...]


    4. Wellrmally I am a Kingsolver fan. I like the way she writes--simple and straight forward. Her stories, both long an short are well done. But this book just really pissed me off. It's a non-fiction account of her back to the land movement with her family. The book starts off well and good. She describes their reasoning for leaving Tuscon and moving to a farm they inherited. She talks about the trials and tribulations of trying to live off of what they can either produce themselves through farming [...]


    5. Dear Barbara Kingsolver,I'm very sorry, but I'm abandoning my attempt to read your book Animal, Vegetable, Miracle, which chronicles the year your family spent living on your farm in Virginia attempting to eat only local, sustainable food.I adore your novels. And I loved Fast Food Nation and The Omnivore's Dilemma. They even made me stop eating fast food, buy organic when I can, and give up most meat.I wanted to love your book. I settled in as you scolded me for eating produce that is flown from [...]


    6. I can forgive the obvious shortcommings of this book for three significant reasons: First, I believe wholeheartedly that by purchasing as much locally grown/made food as possible we can solve our fossil fuel dependency. Secondly, by the luck of the draw I can afford to purchase food from the weekly farmer’s market. And finally, our household is committed to making around 95% of our meals from scratch, which started as a response to our collective allergies (nondairy, meat-eaters) but like the [...]


    7. Onvan : Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life - Nevisande : Barbara Kingsolver - ISBN : 60852550 - ISBN13 : 9780060852559 - Dar 370 Safhe - Saal e Chap : 2007


    8. This books is not AT ALL in my normal wheelhouse, and I'm still scratching my head as to why I suddenly felt impelled to order it on and read it. It's non-fiction, which, nothing against non-fiction, but again, not a genre I normally go out and buy. I might read non-fiction if it's a gift, or library book/freebie, or it's our book club monthly read, but otherwise, not very likely.Also it's a whole book about the author's family's year-long culinary adventure of eating exclusively natural and or [...]


    9. This book gave me desires. Deep dark desires forrdening. And making my own cheese. And doing more things from scratch. And doing them now.The thing is, these are all things I have aspirations to do anyway, but my way is rather slower than the way Barbara Kingsolver and her family approached trying to eat locally for a year. I'm trying to make small, long-term changes, one at a time, hopefully in a way that I'll stick to it. But it was fun to read about someone else's experiment, in mostly non-pr [...]


    10. You have to read this book. Not just because it conveys an important message about the sustainability and environmental impact of our foodways. Not just because its "Year in Provence"-style charm makes Appalachia sound as alluring as the French or Italian countryside (no euros required). But mostly because this is beautiful, tightly-strung writing about food and what it means to nourish ourselves. If you've read a certain amount of writing on food you know, sweet and delicious though it may be, [...]


    11. I have to admit that I have a real love/hate relationship with this book.On one hand, when the author sticks to the actual practicalities and stories of what it took to live on local food only for a year such as the hilarity of turkey sex, the pets vs food dilemma or the aggravation that a zucchini crop can cause, it is a thoroughly enjoyable read. On the other hand, when she goes the route of moralizing and fear mongering about the environment and public health, and stoops to the typical "Ameri [...]


    12. I had a hard time putting this down once I'd started and once I'd finished I wanted to give up NYC life and move to the country to be an organic farmer. I'm hardly joking.Anyone who eats -- and especially those who eat without thinking about where their food comes from -- should read this book. Not only is it informative and a bit scary (though she doesn't present anything terribly new or earth-shattering to those of us who have read things like Fast Food Nation or Portrait of a Burger as a Youn [...]


    13. 3.5★It wasn't that I didn't like this book - I found Kingsolver's message far more palatable as non fiction, rather than using her fiction as a soapbox. & I do think if I ever finish this book, I'll agree with a lot of Kingsolver's conclusions.She is my sister's favourite author, so I gave Trish this book last night. If I don't get it back or can't get the book from another source I will move it on to my dnf shelf.Edit 29/11/16 This book is preaching to the converted with me. Still don't f [...]


    14. My favorite cameo of all times from The Simpsons features Ed Begley Jr with a non-polluting car that runs on "[his] own sense of self-satisfaction." As I read this book, I couldn't help remembering that scene. Is Barbara Kingsolver a talented writer? Undoubtedly. Her descriptions of food are wonderful, and she makes her life on the farm sound idyllic, although she is realistic about the work involved. However, throughout it all,the undercurrent of self-satisfaction makes it hard to take. It's a [...]


    15. I have liked Kingsolver's books in the past and I am easily obsessed with sustainable farming/living/eating issues. So, why didn't I love this book? Several reasons:- Preachy, preachy, preachy. Yowsers, if I wanted to be depressed I'd watch daytime TV, not read a book. It's a lot of doom and gloom, particularly from Kingsolver's husband (uber downer). - Self-righteous, Party of Four. She and her family spend a lot of time planting seeds, celebrating food, pointing fingers, and patting themselves [...]


    16. I was so excited to finally get my hands on this fantastic story about one family's year long experiment in growing & raising most of their own food. I love reading about people who think differently, act differently and live differently than the norm. I think the grow your own philosophy of this family is extreme for our culture but I am so attracted to it because it's a life lived with intention and deep conviction. In comparison I found our own family's efforts in supporting our local agr [...]


    17. I read this. Then I gave it my sister, then she gave it to a friend. Where it went from then I don't know, but I am reasonably confident that this book was of no practical use to any of us.I'm tempted to say that everybody is haunted by the dream of the good life, when your eyes glaze over and you dream of escaping trouble and woe for a better way of living, but I'm probably just projecting my own state of mind here. Certainly though I can sympathise with the position that Barbara Kingsolver fou [...]


    18. If you have ever grown asparagus, thought about growing asparagus or picked wild asparagus, you will enjoy the Waiting for Asparagus chapter. If you adore heirloom tomatoes that have a limited season, taste like real tomatoes, and probably have to be bought at your local farmers market, you will enjoy the chapter Springing Forward where you will not only read about heirloom seeds and their ilk, but also hear the author rant about genetically modified and hybrid corn and soybeans that have been d [...]


    19. First, I want to confess that I didn't finish this book. I couldn't. So there are about thirty pages at the end that I cannot account for, but I seriously doubt that they saved this book from where it had already been, and frankly I was too angered and frustrated to find out.My two major complaints are these:1. Kingsolver (and her husband and older daughter whose interludes are also included) are incredibly smug about the entire process. All the descriptions of what they are doing are terribly s [...]


    20. I received this book in the mail as a recommendation from my dear friend Fievel. The kind gesture was much appreciated.I initially found myself enjoying this book, though I struggled with Kingsolver's assertion that anyone of any income level could participate in her "locavore" (eating local and organic) diet. Putting aside Kingsolver's complete disregard for her privilege, I was intrigued by her tales of gardening and interested in some of her recipes. However, Kingsolver totally lost me when s [...]


    21. I give this book 5 stars because its cause is very close to my heart. It is an excellent primer for sustainable, local food sourcing: it provides a good overview of the issues (including problems faced by small farms and the many dangers to global food supply and health posed by the industrial food complex) and a plan for gradually incorporating local and sustainable foods into your life (small steps, recipes, food plans, resources for learning more, and advice for approaching farmer's markets, [...]


    22. Bullet Review:A good message with some beautiful writing, though Kingsolver and her daughter, Camille, can adopt a rather preachy, self-important tone. And I'm sorry, but I've never encountered the "farmer stigma" that apparently runs rampant over the US.5 stars for content; 2 stars for delivery.Full Review:"If every US citizen ate just one meal a week (any meal) composed of locally and organically raised meats and produce, we would reduce our country's oil consumption by over 1.1 million barrel [...]


    23. Although I didn't plan it, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle seemed like the perfect book to be reading close to Earth Day. Barbara Kingsolver, her husband Steven Hopp, and their children Camille Kingsolver and Lily Hopp moved from Arizona to live at their farm in Southern Appalachia (Virginia). Their goal was to spend one year as locavores--eating local, organic food by growing it themselves and buying it at farmers' markets. In addition to harvesting their gardens and orchards, they raised chickens a [...]


    24. This book is good, in spite of it's lower rating. It loses two stars for two and a half things:1) It is a little slow. Kingsolver is one of the best living writers of fiction, so she has a high standard that she can't quite live up to in this book. My theory is that she is too involved in it. The same talent that allows her to write amazing pieces of fiction detract from her nonfiction in that she just knows too much detail and feels too passionately about what she is talking about. Not that I h [...]


    25. I wanted to like this book. I expected to like this book. And I did like it. I liked about a third of it, to be exact.In this book, Barbara Kingsolver is preaching to the choir as far as I'm concerned; I agree with the importance of local, sustainable eating. That's one of the big reasons I expected to like this. But let's go back to that word "preaching" - I used it advisedly, because, wow, does she. She spends at least a third of her own part of the book preaching, using a tone anyone who has [...]


    26. This is an excellent read. The language, spelling and grammar are highly professional, a joy to read.Barbara and her husband and daughters decided to embark on a year of growing their own food, raising their own poultry and buying local food from farmers. To this end they moved from their Arizona home to their country vacation home in the Appalachian mountains of southwest Virginia. They had prepared, of course, by renovating the house and outbuildings, planting asparagus beds and more. The hope [...]


    27. I have always been a fan of Barbara Kingsolver's work; her novels have a comfortable quality to them that makes me return a few times (except for Prodigal Summer, which I really didn't care much for). But once I discovered her nonfiction, my world changed. She was the first creative nonfiction writer who caught my eye and made me laugh, cry, and feel enraged. Had I not read her work, I doubt I ever would have been interested in writing creative nonfiction to begin with. I tell you all of this so [...]


    28. Good Reads is becoming the place I write what I thought what a book was going to be about and then either come back disappointed or pleasantly surprised.In this case, it's mild disappointment. When I heard about this book and read the review, I thought it would be more like a diary. A multi-person diary about difficulties, triumphs, and oddities of a family living as "locavores" for a year. Kingsolver and family move to their Virginia farm with the intention of eating local for a full year. They [...]


    29. My true GR rating: 0/5 starsTo call this book a trifling piece of trash is, in my opinion, giving it too much credit. This book could have been excellent given the premise of the book. Instead what we get is the author, her husband and her daughter, bloviating at how much America and Americans suck. Europe is so much better.d the list goes on. Just your typical "leftist" bookShe could not even look out for other research to support her "claims"! Instead, we are subjected to the ramblings of her [...]


    30. It took me awhile to get through this one but it was worth it. Barbara Kingsolver is respected novelist and essayist, but to my knowledge this is her first full-length nonfiction book. She describes her family's first year of moving to a farm in Virginia and trying to grow as much of their own food as possible. They raised their own chickens and turkeys. Anything else that they couldn't grow themselves, they bought from other local farmers. The idea first seemed extreme even to me, a liberal, he [...]


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