Daphne du Maurier

Daphne du Maurier Rebecca published in brought its author instant international acclaim capturing the popular imagination with its haunting atmosphere of suspense and mystery du Maurier was immediately establis

  • Title: Daphne du Maurier
  • Author: Margaret Forster
  • ISBN: 9780099333319
  • Page: 240
  • Format: Paperback
  • Rebecca, published in 1938, brought its author instant international acclaim, capturing the popular imagination with its haunting atmosphere of suspense and mystery du Maurier was immediately established as the queen of the psychological thriller But the fame this and her other books encouraged, the reclusive Daphne du Maurier became.Margaret Forster s award wiRebecca, published in 1938, brought its author instant international acclaim, capturing the popular imagination with its haunting atmosphere of suspense and mystery du Maurier was immediately established as the queen of the psychological thriller But the fame this and her other books encouraged, the reclusive Daphne du Maurier became.Margaret Forster s award winning biography could hardly be worthy of its subject Drawing on private letters and papers, and with the unflinching co operation of Daphne du Maurier s family, Margaret Forster explores the secret drama of her life the stifling relationship with her father, actor manager Gerald du Maurier her troubled marriage to war hero and royal aide, Boy Browning her wartime love affair her passion for Cornwall and her deep friendships with the last of her father s actress loves, Gertrude Lawrence, and with an aristocratic American woman.Most significant of all, Margaret Forster ingeniously strips away the relaxed and charming facade to lay bare the true workings of a complex and emotional character whose passionate and often violent stories mirrored her own fantasy life than anyone could ever have imagined.

    Daphne du Maurier Daphne du Maurier was born in London, the middle of three daughters of prominent actor manager Sir Gerald du Maurier and actress Muriel Beaumont Her mother was a maternal niece of journalist, author, and lecturer William Comyns Beaumont. Daphne du Maurier, famous author of Rebecca, Jamaica Inn Daphne du Maurier, author of the famous novels, Jamaica Inn , Frenchman s Creek and Rebecca , was inspired by her love of Cornwall where she lived and wrote Daphne du Maurier Biography, Books and Facts Daphne Du Maurier also known as Lady Browning was a British writer and playwright born on th May in London She belonged to a creative family where her father and mother both were actors, her uncle was a magazine editor and her grandfather was a writer. About Daphne du Maurier Daphne du Maurier th May th April was first and foremost a really excellent storyteller but she was also part of the remarkable du Maurier dynasty a granddaughter, daughter, sister, military wife, mother and grandmother. Daphne Du Maurier Daphne du Maurier was born in and educated at home and in Paris She began writing in , and many of her bestselling novels were set in Cornwall, where she lived for most of her life She was made a DBE in and died in . Daphne du Maurier Author of Rebecca If Daphne du Maurier had written only Rebecca, she would still be one of the great shapers of popular culture and the modern imagination.Few writers have created magical and mysterious places than Jamaica Inn and Manderley, buildings invested with a rich Daphne Du Maurier Biography Daphne Du Maurier was one of the most popular English writers of the th Century, when middle brow genre fiction was accorded a higher level of respect in a broadly literate age For her services to literature, she was made a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire in , the female equivalent of a knighthood. Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier Daphne du Maurier s Rebecca is crucial to the genre, for in it du Maurier simplified and organized these six elements, refining the narrative, concentrating the mythic, and enriching the ambiguity of her tale What du Maurier understood is that the heart of the romantic Rebecca Daphne Du Maurier This special edition of Rebecca includes excerpts from Daphne du Maurier s The Rebecca Notebook and Other Memories, an essay on the real Manderley, du Maurier s original epilogue to the book, and The Book Review Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and Read it Rebecca novel Rebecca is a Gothic novel by English author Dame Daphne du Maurier.A best seller, Rebecca sold . million copies between its publication in and , and the book has never gone out of print.

    • [PDF] ✓ Free Download × Daphne du Maurier : by Margaret Forster ✓
      240 Margaret Forster
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ✓ Free Download × Daphne du Maurier : by Margaret Forster ✓
      Posted by:Margaret Forster
      Published :2019-05-17T17:48:20+00:00

    About “Margaret Forster”

    1. Margaret Forster

      Margaret Forster was educated at the Carlisle and County High School for Girls From here she won an Open Scholarship to Somerville College, Oxford where in 1960 she was awarded an honours degree in History From 1963 Margaret Forster worked as a novelist, biographer and freelance literary critic, contributing regularly to book programmes on television, to Radio 4 and various newpapers and magazines.Forster was married to the writer, journalist and broadcaster Hunter Davies They lived in London and in the Lake District They had three children, Caitlin, Jake and Flora.

    837 thoughts on “Daphne du Maurier”

    1. I picked up this biography a few years ago from the discard shelf of my local library. How sad! Published in 1993, it seems it should still be relevant. Even if all Du Maurier ever wrote was Rebecca, that's still impressive, isn't it? makes her worthy of today's library shelves? I didn't know much about her but her list of titles--novels, plays, short stories, family and historical biographies--is long. Still the biography sat on my stack of unread books for a couple years.A few months ago I cam [...]


    2. In The Uncommon Reader, Alan Bennett has his main character, Queen Elizabeth II, reflect that authors are "probably best met within the pages of their novels" and are "as much creatures of the reader's imagination as the characters in their books". There’s wisdom in that attitude. It’s quite possible that I’d be disappointed if I encountered one of my favourite novelists at a dinner party and that experience might colour how I react to their writing in the future. And yet, I still find mys [...]


    3. A very complete, no holds barred biography about an author whose novels I have long admired.Forster had access to hundreds of family and friend letters, as well as being able to interview those close to Du Maurier. Her written portrait of Daphne paints a woman both brilliant and conflicted in her sexuality, her marriage, her role as a mother and her overriding need to express all these inner conflicts through her writing. Forster not only sketches the life history of Du Maurier (which is fascina [...]


    4. Very clear, insightful biography of the author, with emphasis on her inner turmoil as she continually attempted to balance the needs of the outside world - society, family, husband's career needs, friends and confidantes - with the constant need to write. This is a dilemma felt by many writers, that in order to write, there's a need for long periods of solitude to think, reason, plan, research, write and re-write. I emphasize that this is not merely a desire, but a need, and one which most nonwr [...]


    5. I read Forster’s biography immediately after reading the more recently published book Manderley Forever. Author Tatiana de Rosnay did a rather bold thing by writing her novel in the present tense; not quite getting inside the skin of ‘Daphne’ by giving her protagonist the first-person voice, but still presenting the events of Daphne du Maurier’s life as if she (and the reader) were eyewitnesses. It’s an interesting and entertaining read, but in many ways I felt it did not manage to mak [...]



    6. This was a very interesting and thoroughly researched read. However I found it diminished rather than enhanced my view of Daphne Du Maurier and her oeuvre. Her was a woman who lived to write and wrote to live and everyone and everything apart from perhaps Menabilly took a second place to that. It is easier I suppose to accept as a modern day reader to accept her conflicted sexuality but not so easy to accept her self confessed disinterest in her children and laterally her grandchildren. She also [...]


    7. This was a pleasant read – as good as any novel about a strange, elusive woman who happened to have written a lot of books, have a desire to be a recluse and whose inner life was often a struggle between different personalities.I had recently seen a BBC production about Daphne du Maurier, and having read some of her books and being fascinated by the era she belonged to as well as the area she lived in, I was curious to explore her life further. And what capable hands her life is in in those of [...]


    8. This biography explores the motivations behind Daphne du Maurier's numerous spellbinding works. In a prolific writing career that began in 1931 with The Loving Spirit and subsequently spanned fifty years, the portrait that emerges is that of a woman constantly at odds with herself. Her various literary achievements coupled with a drive to succeed often conflicted with her role as a wife and a mother.Access to Daphne's personal correspondence has allowed the author to reveal such private details [...]


    9. An excellent biography by a superb writer.Margaret Forster explores Daphne du Maurier's background and details her sometimes difficult relationship with her famour father, Gerald, before examining Daphne's complex and intriguing character.She has the co-operation of Daphne's family so every little aspect of her life is looked at in detail and nothing is ignored; her troubled marriage to 'Boy' Browning and how she battled to keep it going, her various love affairs and how she handled Daphne No1 a [...]


    10. There is something faintly disconcerting about the stripping away of someone’s private life in non-fiction writing. Reading not even between the lines, the vision you get of Daphne du M is that she was rather a self-absorbed and even a rather selfish character. She lived a fairly sheltered and privileged life, and indeed seemed more preoccupied with remaining the inhabitant of the house of Menabilly than with her own children. She certainly wasn’t particularly maternal or sociable. She was s [...]


    11. In many ways, Daphne du Maurier is as unlikeable as the heroines of some of her greatest books, but in the same ways, she's also compelling. This was an excellent bio, candid without being lurid, enquiring without going too wildly astray into the author's own theories. As a writer, I'm always fascinated by where other writers get their ideas from and how they go about writing. Du Maurier was a major and detailed plotter, keeping immense amounts of notes and diaries, and only writing (save one bo [...]


    12. An excellent woman, writer and biography. At times totally heartbreaking as we see the writer whose full life is hollow when she cannot create.


    13. I usually find biographies pretty hard going and tend to give up a chapter or so in (I think this is only the second one I've managed to finish) but this one was different: well written, not the least bit boring and full of genuine empathy for du Maurier who, as it turns out, was quite a piece of work. Very matter-of-fact about her various biases and prejudices; du Maurier is taken in context as a product of her time and class. So far the only biography which hasn't ruined the subject for me!


    14. Great fun to spend 400 pages in the company of this genuine eccentric woman. Her prolific letters and diaries made the biographer's task easy. I find myself for the first time grateful for You Tube-- where I could see a bit of film of Daphne still in her prime, while reading the last few sad pages of crotchety old age.


    15. Wonderful biography of life of the very complex writer Daphne Du Maurier. Drawing from original letters, documents and interviews with family and friends this biography tells the story of a complicated and tormented woman, who felt at odds with the world her whole life. Born Into a theatrical family and the granddaughter of another famous novelist, Daphne Du Maurier had from all outward aspects a charmed upbringing, but nothing is at it appears on the surface. The book takes an unflinching look [...]


    16. Forster has given us a well research and well written portrayal of du Maurier. She shows us the story of this oft troubled, conflicted writer who never gained sufficient self-confidence to understand her own level of genius and creativity. Daphne, the child, was the darling of her dad and never developed a proper mother-daughter relationship, yet her relationship with her dad was not totally healthy as she so wanted to be his good and proper son. This may have led to a deeply rooted conflict whi [...]


    17. A meticulously researched book which charts this well known and popular author's somewhat unusual, and at times surprisingly unconventional life from her childhood untill her death.I became immersed in this biography, which was very well written I had expected from it's author.It was fascinating to read about the actual writing of du Maurier's books in such depth, and to learn of how many of them were inspired by real life people, places and events, and of how she returns time and time again, in [...]


    18. I must confess I have not read any of Daphne De Mauriers books, all I knew of her was through the Dirk Bogarde Autobiography's, in which she had made her disatifactio0n with Dirks portrayal of her husband ‘boy browning’This book was given to me by my Mother… I think it was a sign from her that she was trying to understand my sexuality. I read the book keenly wanting to know how this lady had dealt with the demons we all have to face. It is a wonderfully written book, the family co-operat [...]


    19. Daphne Du Maurier is a fascinating study. A woman way ahead of her time. An artist who was as dark and complex as her female characters. The Du Muarier family were all as interesting and as talented in other art forms as she was in the literary world. I thoroughly enjoyed this biography and would recommend it.


    20. A beautifully written biography of one of the world's literary greats. Margaret Forster's compassion for her subject comes through, but never to the extent that she avoids being critical when necessary. This really is the seminal work on du Maurrier.I loved this book.© Koplowitz 2012


    21. Hello! This is my long overdue book discussion/review of Margaret Forster's biography of one of my favorite authors ever, Daphne du Maurier! Let's dive right in!When I first came across this book in the summer of 2014, I absolutely couldn't believe it had never occurred to me to read a book about du Maurier's life even though I'd been obsessed with her for ages. It was only when I came across this same book this past summer in June at a Goodwill for the brilliant price of three bucks that I deci [...]


    22. This is certainly a fine book, carefully researched and scrupulously eschewing exaggeration or extrapolation. The subject became, unexpectedly, less and less interesting or relatable the farther along I got, to the point that by the end I heartily disliked her. But that is no fault of the biographer, who soldiered on in an admirable spirit of unvarnished truth-telling. I felt oddly honor-bound to see the book through to the end, which I did.So. I did find DdM’s life to be of some historical in [...]


    23. This is a well-written biography that is careful to try to present a balanced picture of duMaurier, difficult to do with such a thoroughly unlikeable subject. The writer was uneducated, sheltered, never had a real job, hostile or indifferent toward her husband and children except when it suited her to act otherwise, utterly self-absorbed and with a big mean streak. She talked a lot about valuing independence, but never lived without servants, and certainly did not have the courage to acknowledge [...]


    24. Very readable biography of this complex and interesting woman. As with most thorough biographies, maybe if you don't like finding out the less attractive side of a favourite person's character you should avoid it (everyone has one! In Daphne's case, a certain coldness to her daughters and grandchildren - she was what used to be known as a "boy's mother" - some snobbery, the reluctance of the wealthy to pay taxes, and some rather selfish behaviour generally). The story of her background, what tod [...]




    25. I enjoyed this very much - Forster is a writer whose other work I've liked, and De Maurier was an interesting, complex person who Forster does a great job of interpreting. du Maurier's family cooperated fully and she lived in the era when letters flourished. She grew up in an artistic family. Her grandfather was the writer and Punch cartoonist George du Maurier, best known for the novel Trilby. Her father was the actor-manager Gerald du Maurier who happened to be brother of Sylvia Llewelyn Davie [...]


    26. It was fascinating as an author to read this excellent biography of another author. Life was not easy for Daphne du Maurier. Family relationships were strained at times. She was close to her father as a child, but he was very domineering. Thus she often wrote the men in her novels as uncaring, mysterious and distant. (view spoiler)[Daphne had issues with her sexuality, finding her romantic entanglements with men more of "older brother" "best friend" with no chemistry. She did have affairs with w [...]


    27. Daphne du Maurier's books, "The Scapegoat" and "The King's General" are among my all-time favorite reads. Though I great enjoyed some of her more well-known books like "Rebecca," I've read these two multiple times. I own them both and will never let them leave my library. Thus I was curious to add to my scant info on du Maurier. A fascinating life and boo, though I did get tired of her obsessions by the end. The biographic details are of interest but the real meat of the story is what she wrote, [...]


    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *