They Tell No Tales

They Tell No Tales When the British Admiralty asks British Intelligence for help in nailing down saboteurs it s Tommy Hambledon that told China hand at espionage who is sent to the Portsmouth naval base Hambledon is

  • Title: They Tell No Tales
  • Author: Manning Coles
  • ISBN: 9781601870261
  • Page: 146
  • Format: Paperback
  • When the British Admiralty asks British Intelligence for help in nailing down saboteurs, it s Tommy Hambledon, that told China hand at espionage, who is sent to the Portsmouth naval base Hambledon is to meet a dockyard workman with a story to tell The workman arrives at the rendezvous all right, only to be shot dead before he can open his mouth.Hambledon, hampered by aWhen the British Admiralty asks British Intelligence for help in nailing down saboteurs, it s Tommy Hambledon, that told China hand at espionage, who is sent to the Portsmouth naval base Hambledon is to meet a dockyard workman with a story to tell The workman arrives at the rendezvous all right, only to be shot dead before he can open his mouth.Hambledon, hampered by a romantically inclined colleague, and practically cluesless, must now proceed to put a name and a face to a cold blooded adversaryfast

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      Published :2019-05-13T17:00:09+00:00

    About “Manning Coles”

    1. Manning Coles

      From , the free encyclopedia Manning Coles is the pseudonym of two British writers, Adelaide Frances Oke Manning 1891 1959 and Cyril Henry Coles 1899 1965 , who wrote many spy thrillers from the early 40s through the early 60s The fictional protagonist in 26 of their books was Thomas Elphinstone Hambledon, who works for the Foreign Office.Manning and Coles were neighbors in East Meon, Hampshire Coles worked for British Intelligence in both the World Wars Manning worked for the War Office during World War I Their first books were fairly realistic and with a touch of grimness their postwar books perhaps suffered from an excess of lightheartedness and whimsy They also wrote a number of humorous novels about modern day ghosts, some of them involving ghostly cousins named Charles and James Latimer These novels were published in England under the pseudonym of Francis Gaite but released in the United States under the Manning Coles byline.Many of the original exploits were based on the real life experiences of Coles, who lied about his age and enlisted under an assumed name in a Hampshire regiment during World War I while still a teenager He eventually became the youngest officer in British intelligence, often working behind German lines, due to his extraordinary ability to master languages Coles had 2 sons Michael and Peter, who were identical twins and who are both still alive, living in the UK and the Ghost stories were based on the tales he used to tell his young sons when he was back from his travels.

    165 thoughts on “They Tell No Tales”

    1. You would scarcely credit the wonderful things people don't see. Why, there was a Bank messenger knocked down and robbed of fifteen thousand pounds in this very street some years ago, in the middle of the day with the pavements full of people, and how many of them saw it, do you think?They Tell No Tales (1941) by Manning Coles is the third of his Tommy Hambledon spy novels. Hambledon has just returned to England after a successful spying stint in Germany. He's barely had a chance to get used to [...]



    2. The third book featuring Tommy Hambledon. Not as powerful as the first two, but nice characterizations, and a good insight into English life at that time. You have to ignore one problem - Hambledon works for MI6 and as such would never be asked to investigate matters in England, but not a big issue. Characters from the first two novels appear. This one is moe like a mystery novel that a counter intelligence book. However, very absorbing and a good read. Also a book I have re-read many times.


    3. Tommy Hambledon is just back in England after completing his assignment in Germany. Before he can even settle in he is recruited to solve the ship bombings that keep happening in Portsmouth Harbor. He is given a junior intelligence officer, Jimmy Bellair, as an assistant.The case is hush-hush and must be kept completely secret, so the agents plan to meet their informant at the Café D'Albertini on New Year's Eve. Just as the informant is entering the restaurant he his killed. The café is packed [...]


    4. Someone is sabotaging naval ships at Portsmouth, and who better to investigate than Tommy Hambledon, back in England after many years. A cross-section of people are visiting a popular restaurant for New Year's Eve when the man Tommy hopes will give him information is shot. As Tommy and his young assistant try to find the man behind the sabotage, danger lurks in the peaceful English streets.


    5. Satisfying third entry in the Tommy Hambledon series. Lovely light humor mixed with murder and espionage in pre-WWII England. A treat!



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