Rethinking Life and Death

Rethinking Life and Death The new commandments according to Rethinking Life and Death If you must take human life take responsibility for the consequences of your decisions All human life is not of equal worth treat beings in

  • Title: Rethinking Life and Death
  • Author: Peter Singer
  • ISBN: 9780312144012
  • Page: 473
  • Format: Paperback
  • The new commandments according to Rethinking Life and Death If you must take human life, take responsibility for the consequences of your decisions All human life is not of equal worth treat beings in accordance to the ethical situation at hand Respect a person s desire to live or die.A profound and provocative work, Rethinking Life and Death, in the tradition of AThe new commandments according to Rethinking Life and Death If you must take human life, take responsibility for the consequences of your decisions All human life is not of equal worth treat beings in accordance to the ethical situation at hand Respect a person s desire to live or die.A profound and provocative work, Rethinking Life and Death, in the tradition of Aldous Huxley s Brave New World, examines the ethical dilemmas that confront us as we near the twenty first century.

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    About “Peter Singer”

    1. Peter Singer

      Peter Albert David Singer is an Australian philosopher He is the Ira W DeCamp Professor of Bioethics at Princeton University, and laureate professor at the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics CAPPE , University of Melbourne He specializes in applied ethics, approaching ethical issues from a secular preference utilitarian perspective.He has served, on two occasions, as chair of philosophy at Monash University, where he founded its Centre for Human Bioethics In 1996, he ran unsuccessfully as a Green candidate for the Australian Senate In 2004, he was recognized as the Australian Humanist of the Year by the Council of Australian Humanist Societies.Outside academic circles, Singer is best known for his book Animal Liberation, widely regarded as the touchstone of the animal liberation movement Not all members of the animal liberation movement share this view, and Singer himself has said the media overstates his status His views on that and other issues in bioethics have attracted attention and a degree of controversy.Excerpted from.

    296 thoughts on “Rethinking Life and Death”

    1. Occasionally, I like to read books that I know I will disagree with. I feel like the process of reading arguments that I disagree with expands my mind. This is one of those books. Surprisingly, I agreed with more than I thought I would. Ultimately, I disagreed with his conclusions, but there were plenty of arguments I agreed with along the way.I really did feel like this book expanded my mind. I'll first discuss some of the ways in which I felt this book helped me do that, and then I'll discuss [...]


    2. I disagree with some of the premises and conclusions Peter Singer puts forth in this text, but these are, usually, differences of degree rather than kind. I find the vast majority of his work to be very solidly supported, and am somewhat bemused at how much rage and hatred he seems to attract in some circles. This, in all likelihood, deserves five stars, but it's not his best work, and I found it a little basic in certain areas. However, I wholeheartedly recommended as a thorough primer to a uti [...]


    3. Really amazing. Working in the health care industry it means more to me than maybe to others. At some points you feel physically disturbed because you see his point and agree with what he has to say, even though it may be against everything you have been taught and believed in previously. I recommend this to everyone.


    4. This was my favourite of his. In a Nietzschean Genealogy of Morals kind of way he addresses issues such as abortion and euthanasia by looking at the history of how we conceptualise 'being alive' and the moralities that stem for that. He has one of the best arguments for abortion that I have ever heard.


    5. For the most part, Rethinking Life and Death seems like a clumsily put together collection of medical and legal scenarios that explore the decisions involved in choosing a human's fate. This is glued together with philosophical questions, historical perspectives, a bit of neuroscience, and some logical propositions.About two-thirds into the book though, you start to get the impression that Singer is actually building up to something revolutionary. Unfortunately, I think I can see where he's aimi [...]


    6. It is not a book to take lightly. The issues here are of the most importance. Medicine, philosophy and everyday life have to deal with the situations that stay in a grey area of morality and ethics. At the end the authors shows the great difficulties in making the right decision in a situation where line between life and death is very thin. As neuroscience and medicine developed with time and new frontiers are opened the dilemmas discussed in this book will have different answers and conclusions [...]


    7. Profoundly interesting. It really requires an open mind, because as Singer says multiple times, and as the title suggests, it is advocating a collapse of what we consider to be traditional and common place ethics. Many of the ideas inside are ones I had considered but felt were too extreme to openly admit, but what Singer promotes makes rational sense, and I'm in support of at least a number of what he is advocating for. It is a shift, but it's one I feel could begin to take place.


    8. Singer takes aim at verities such as 'the sanctity of all human life' whether brain dead really means that and what we mean by consciousness in life and death situations. He covers euthanasia, abortion and comas. Makes many excellent points. Argues for the right of other species to be afforded the same consideration as humans. He doesn't say what the meat eaters among us should do. Just a trace of overwriting at times in this book which tried my patience.


    9. Interesting to know other people's thoughts on how the 'human being' is perceived and what is a 'human being' vs a 'person' and how this could or could not play out in the medical world. I can't say I agree with much of what is said but it's vital to stay informed of what the current trends in world thinking are.


    10. A really well-written and fascinating book arguing for big changes to the way we currently think about ethical questions of life and death. Although I don't agree with all of his views, his arguments are most informative and thought-provoking and help to deepen my own reflections on these topics. Highly recommended.


    11. provocative. with utilitarian ethics as its premise, peter singer explores the traditional ways in which humans have ascribed value to individuals, and how internal inconsistencies in such evaluation methods may lead to serious moral complications. whether or not you agree with his conclusions, the brilliance of his new way of thinking is respectable and distinctively modern.


    12. More provocative than substantial. Enough over-simplifications and statements-that-are-true-because-I-say-so that I'm overall unpersuaded. This book is more anthemic than rigorous in my view. That said, he's a talented writer and clearly quite bright.



    13. A very thought provoking book. he has some very radical concepts, but wherever you stand on these views, it will cause you to think more deeply about these topics.


    14. Well written, challenging ideas which are presented in a logical and clear way. Regardless of your opinions of the author's stances, I would argue this book is worth the read.


    15. This book will make you think about issues relating to life and death that you may not have considered. Excellent read.




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