Eight Pieces On Prostitution

Eight Pieces On Prostitution The stories in Eight Pieces on Prostitution span the whole of my writing life and include my first published story The Man Who Liked to Come with the News which Frank Moorhouse chose for his a

  • Title: Eight Pieces On Prostitution
  • Author: Dorothy Johnston
  • ISBN: 9780987548801
  • Page: 374
  • Format: ebook
  • The stories in Eight Pieces on Prostitution span the whole of my writing life and include my first published story, The Man Who Liked to Come with the News , which Frank Moorhouse chose for his 1983 anthology, The State of the Art My first novel, Tunnel Vision , is set in a Melbourne massage parlour, and I have continued to return to the theme of prostitution in my n The stories in Eight Pieces on Prostitution span the whole of my writing life and include my first published story, The Man Who Liked to Come with the News , which Frank Moorhouse chose for his 1983 anthology, The State of the Art My first novel, Tunnel Vision , is set in a Melbourne massage parlour, and I have continued to return to the theme of prostitution in my novels and short stories, notably in The House at Number 10 and in this collection Where the Ladders Start is a long story, almost a novella, based around a suspicious death Many of the stories are set in Canberra, Australia s national capital, where I lived for thirty years before returning to Victoria s Bellarine Peninsula.The cover design is based on a painting by Bartolome Esteban Murillo called Two Women at a Window , which is held at the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC Though the women in the painting are probably prostitutes, it is not absolutely clear there s an ambiguity about them, as well as an amused self awareness I like this very much and feel that it suits my stories Dorothy Johnston

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      Posted by:Dorothy Johnston
      Published :2019-08-06T03:04:17+00:00

    About “Dorothy Johnston”

    1. Dorothy Johnston

      Dorothy Johnston is the author of ten novels Her tenth, and the first in a new sea change mystery series, was published in April 2016 It is titled Through a Camel s Eye Dorothy has published a quartet of detective novels set in Canberra The first of these, The Trojan Dog, was joint winner ACT Book of the Year, and the Age gave it their Best of 2000 in the crime section It was published in Australia by Wakefield Press and in the United States by St Martin s Press The second, The White Tower, was also published in Australia and North America, and the third, Eden, appeared in 2007 All three feature the cyber sleuth Sandra Mahoney and her partner, Ivan Semyonov, along with Detective Sergeant Brook, of the ACT police With Eden, Dorothy returned to the subject of prostitution, which has long interested her and provided inspiration Her first novel, Tunnel Vision, is set in a Melbourne massage parlour The House at Number 10 Wakefield Press 2005 continues this theme Two of her other literary novels, One for the Master and Ruth, have been shortlisted for the Miles Franklin award She has had numerous short stories published in magazines and anthologies.

    482 thoughts on “Eight Pieces On Prostitution”

    1. I found this a compelling, highly original book on a subject few people can handle with such untroubled candour. As always, Dorothy Johnston sees deeply into her characters and takes us with her, and as always the mysterious incompleteness and the loose ends of life are left trailing to trouble us. I won't forget Evie, in "The Studio", standing hitching by the road with her rucksack sewn with hundreds of glittering stars, or Mrs B, dancing in the kitchen of the massage parlour "singing loudly an [...]


    2. In ‘Eight Pieces on Prostitution’ Dorothy Johnson lifts the veil on the hidden life of those who sell their bodies for money. I expected, in my ignorance, a seedy, shadowed world of dimmed lights and tawdry trappings. I feared to find women and girls compelled by traffickers, abused, afraid and oppressed. What I found, in fact, was none of these things.The prostitutes here provide a service but remain, emotionally and in a strange way almost physically, detached from it. They are sensitive a [...]


    3. The first six pieces are very short and there is a dream-like, almost surreal feeling to the writing which I really enjoyed. They encourage the reader to stop and think about these women we are being given a glimpse of, to wonder about their lives. They are pursuing what to most of us is a very unusual trade, one we have no contact with, no experience of. We have all formed opinions of prostitution but this understated presentation of what they do challenges us to rethink what we thought we knew [...]


    4. These books were very well-written and reminded me a little of some short stories from turn of the century writers, such as Katherine Mansfield or Anais Nin. Unlike those stories, however, the stories generated a strong sense of distance between the subjects and the reader. This was an interesting effect as it helped us to feel a little like the prostitutes' clients, seeing small details about their lives but never really knowing them fully. It was also jarring in a way: for all the familiar det [...]


    5. Eight short stories on the theme of prostitution plus a novella on the same topic. Each story stands on its own merits - I particularly enjoyed "the Studio" and "Mrs B" but the standard of the story-telling is maintained through all of them. In most of the stories the success of the writer is in how she has made the lives and actions of the prostitutes feel very normal. We are in everyday life, perhaps for some of us getting closer to the world of prostitution than we have before.I would have li [...]


    6. This is an excellent book that perhaps needs a better title as it took me quite some time before I was willing to look past that. However the story is hardly drenched in sex or offensive. This would make an excellent book for book clubs that are searching for material that encourages a group discussion and engages readers.


    7. Though the central theme is prostitution, it's not a gritty read, but it’s not "Pretty Woman" either. The jewel is "Where the Ladders Start," a psychological mystery of three prostitutes with a dead client on their hands. Exceptionally well-written.




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