The Politics of Knowledge in Premodern Islam: Negotiating Ideology and Religious Inquiry

The Politics of Knowledge in Premodern Islam Negotiating Ideology and Religious Inquiry The eleventh and twelfth centuries comprised a period of great significance in Islamic history The Great Saljuqs a Turkish speaking tribe hailing from central Asia ruled the eastern half of the Isla

  • Title: The Politics of Knowledge in Premodern Islam: Negotiating Ideology and Religious Inquiry
  • Author: Omid Safi
  • ISBN: 9780807856574
  • Page: 384
  • Format: Paperback
  • The eleventh and twelfth centuries comprised a period of great significance in Islamic history The Great Saljuqs, a Turkish speaking tribe hailing from central Asia, ruled the eastern half of the Islamic world for a great portion of that time In a far reaching analysis that combines social, cultural, and political history, Omid Safi demonstrates how the Saljuqs tried toThe eleventh and twelfth centuries comprised a period of great significance in Islamic history The Great Saljuqs, a Turkish speaking tribe hailing from central Asia, ruled the eastern half of the Islamic world for a great portion of that time In a far reaching analysis that combines social, cultural, and political history, Omid Safi demonstrates how the Saljuqs tried to create a lasting political presence by joining forces with scholars and saints, among them a number of well known Sufi Muslims, who functioned under state patronage In order to legitimize their political power, Saljuq rulers presented themselves as champions of what they alleged was an orthodox and normative view of Islam Their notion of religious orthodoxy was constructed by administrators in state sponsored arenas such as madrasas and khanaqahs Thus orthodoxy was linked to political loyalty, and disloyalty to the state was articulated in terms of religious heresy Drawing on a vast reservoir of primary sources and eschewing anachronistic terms of analysis such as nationalism, Safi revises conventional views both of the Saljuqs as benevolent Muslim rulers and of the Sufis as timeless, ethereal mystics He makes a significant contribution to understanding premodern Islam as well as illuminating the complex relationship between power and religious knowledge.

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      Published :2019-08-20T03:04:23+00:00

    About “Omid Safi”

    1. Omid Safi

      Omid Safi is Associate Professor of Islamic Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he specializes on Islamic mysticism Sufism , contemporary Islamic thought, and medieval Islamic history He received his PhD from Duke University in 2000 Before coming to UNC, he was an Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion at Colgate University in Hamilton, New York Safi is the Chair for the Study of Islam at the American Academy of Religion He is also a member of the advisory board of the Pluralism Project at Harvard University His book The Politics of Knowledge in Premodern Islam, dealing with medieval Islamic history and politics, was published in 2006 His translation and analysis of Rumi s biography is forthcoming from Fons Vitae, and his book Memories of Muhammad will be published in Winter of 2009 by HarperOne Safi has been at the forefront of the progressive Muslim debate His book Progressive Muslims, published in 2003, contains a diverse collection of essays by and about progressive Muslims He was one of the cofounders of the Progressive Muslim Union PMU NA Safi resigned from PMU in 2005, but he continues to support progressive interpretations of Islam outside of PMU.

    910 thoughts on “The Politics of Knowledge in Premodern Islam: Negotiating Ideology and Religious Inquiry”

    1. it felt a bit shallow and rushed at times, but overall it was a fascinating read. it's a shame more history books aren't like this.


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